StoryBonding&Positioning

One Wrong Assumption, Deep Sabotage, And 95% of Storytelling Mistakes

August 16, 2020 Abdulaziz M Alhamdan M.Sc. Episode 27
StoryBonding&Positioning
One Wrong Assumption, Deep Sabotage, And 95% of Storytelling Mistakes
Chapters
StoryBonding&Positioning
One Wrong Assumption, Deep Sabotage, And 95% of Storytelling Mistakes
Aug 16, 2020 Episode 27
Abdulaziz M Alhamdan M.Sc.

#027 This one wrong assumption can kill all your hopes to become a great storyteller.

It's hidden, lurking in the shadows, to kill all your storytelling progress.

The good news is: it's simple to fix.

If you want to tell enchanting stories that transform your relationships, get you more clients, help you give better presentations, and simply become a more interesting person, then listen to this Episode right now...

...And click: Subscribe, to join the StoryBonding Family.

Music: THBD - Good For You

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/StoryBonding)

Show Notes Transcript

#027 This one wrong assumption can kill all your hopes to become a great storyteller.

It's hidden, lurking in the shadows, to kill all your storytelling progress.

The good news is: it's simple to fix.

If you want to tell enchanting stories that transform your relationships, get you more clients, help you give better presentations, and simply become a more interesting person, then listen to this Episode right now...

...And click: Subscribe, to join the StoryBonding Family.

Music: THBD - Good For You

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/StoryBonding)

## Chapter 5: One Wrong Assumption, Deep Sabotage, And 95% of Storytelling Failures

This one wrong assumption can kill all your hopes to become a great storyteller. In a few minutes, you'll be surprised.

So listen, take notes, and subscribe to this Podcast right now.

### 5.1 Introduction

95% of people can't tell a good story, and I was one of them.

It's New Years' Eve. The whole family is there, laughing, having a good time.

And I wanted some of that human connection.

But I'm an introvert. Conversations are an Enigma for me. 

Telling stories was my Kryptonite. Whenever I tried, I felt pressured, as if I needed to break the code to some Alien language in order to save the Earth from Alien destruction.

I totally turned into a sweaty mess. My stories were a mess.

That night, my crazy uncle looked at me and said: "What's wrong with him?!"

I felt so humiliated, I stopped. I assumed storytelling is not for me.

### 5.1 Ukraine Contrast

Contrast that with what happened in the Summer of last year.

I'm there, on the Dnipro river in Ukraine.

It's 10 PM. I'm with 4 crazy Ukrainians, sitting around a warm night fire, listening to our friend Nazar playing DakhaBrakha... his skinny fingers gliding like butter on his old guitar.

And I looked at the full moon beautifully illuminating the river, water vibrating with energy. 

The music. The friends. The moon. The moment is magical.

And I thought: what happened? 

Why do I have friends in a foreign country, when back home I barely had any real friends?

And the answer hit me: It was Storytelling.

Stories bonded me with these good people more than anything else.

What was the difference? 

I have decided to learn storytelling. I no longer assume it's something I cannot do.

### 5.2 The Red Motorcycle

Because assumptions can limit our lives in a tragic way.

Like the sad story of this young man who graduated High School. Excited to begin his College life. 

Still acting like a rebel, just like all teenagers, he spent that final high school year verbally fighting with his father.

All this young man wanted is to get a red motorcycle, ride around California, wind blowing in his hair, and to be a movie star.

And all his father wanted is to give him the Brown Book. 

The Brown Book is the journal where his grandfather wrote all the lessons learned... from the day he arrived to America as a poor immigrant to the day he built their family business. 

When the Young Man accepts the Brown Book, he accepts responsibility for the family business. It's a promise. A vow.

And that day: the young man returned home excited to celebrate! Congratulations everywhere! A cake bigger than any birthday!

That night, his father brought the Brown Book and the young man boiled with rage.

"I hate you! All you want is to kill my dreams!"

And a big fight started. The biggest fight of their lives. 

That night, the young man closed the door to his family home for the last time.

He disappeared. Somewhere in California. Breaking all contact.

Sometimes, his father figured out his number and called him, but that call was blocked and the number quickly stopped working.

A year passed. Two years. Five years.

Five years later, the young man received a call from a blocked number.

The voice said: "Hurry home. Your father is dying."

Suddenly, he found himself rushing home. 

Suddenly, he felt his love for his father filling every cell of his body.

But when he arrived, it was too late: 

His father was dead.

He cried that night hugging the cold body of his dead father, wishing things were different, wishing their lives went another way.

Then, he saw the Brown Book. 

With tears in his eyes, he opened it. And a thin key to a red motorcycle fell on the floor...

That's what assumptions do.

The Young Man assumed he knew what's in the book based on its cover, and didn't take the time to verify.

### 5.3 Struggling Storytellers VS Great Storytellers

And most people tell a few stories, then assume they can't do it well, they can't excel at telling the great stories that will transform their relationships and their future.

All because of this assumption: That whatever happened in the past will be their future.

That history is destined to repeat itself.

Just like that young man assumed just because his father was against his red motorcycle, that his father cannot suddenly change, accept and encourage those dreams.

But the issue is deeper than this:

Our identity is the foundation for our future.

The real difference between those who become great storytellers and those who don't is the same difference between Rich People and Poor People.

Poor People know they don't have money, they feel they don't have money, they worry they don't have money, and so they focus on making money from a place of scarcity.

While Rich People know they have money, they feel rich, they don't worry about money, and so they came at making money from a place where they are good but want more.

The exact same dynamic happens with storytelling:

The struggling storytellers, deep down believe they're not good at telling stories, so they look for evidence to confirm they can't tell great stories, and that's why everything they do comes from a place of scarcity: An assumption they are broken and need to get fixed.

So everything they learn subconsciously confirms to them they are broken. Again and again and again. A vicious cycle that needs to end.

While great storytellers don't feel broken. Even if, at first, they didn't know how to tell great stories, they were curious about learning. They approach learning as a fun process, a positive process, where they love where they are and want to make themselves even better. They approach life from a place of Abundance. And their success as an enjoyable journey of experimentation and making what is good even better.

### 5.4 Story Blindness

And I find the biggest sign someone is coming from a place of Scarcity in Storytelling is: 

Story Blindness.

Story Blindness is when a person cannot see all the stories happening in their lives every day. They feel they can't find great stories to tell. That their life is too boring to be worth sharing.

An example of a great woman who elevated herself from a place of Storytelling Struggle to StoryBonding Glory is my client Charlize from Vancouver, Canada.

And I'm telling this story with her permission (Hello there Charlize).

When we first began working together, Charlize told me:

"I keep looking, but I can't find any stories I can tell about my day!"

"It's easier than you think. Choose something and I'll tell you a story about it."

So, here is the story. Try to guess what she chose for me:

> When I sit on my work desk, I ALWAYS have a cup half-filled with water near me. Because when I first began my online business, my brain imagined the darkest worst possible worries and showed them to me in high-definition, as if I watched the worst horror movie in full 3D all day long. I knew if I didn't take control of my own brain, if I didn't train myself to see the positive, I will give up and I'll never succeed. So, I decided to always see the cup half full, never half empty. I decided to remind myself to stay optimistic. That's why there is a cup half full of water near me now.

That's it. A simple Internal-Process StoryBonding story created without preparation.

And yes, what my client Charlize chose for me was: Water.

### 5.5 Conclusion

Now, it's your turn:

Do you truly believe you have what it takes to tell great stories?

Even more importantly: Think of your big goal, right now. Imagine the life you want... 

...All your problems solved, living life exactly the way that will make you happy.

Can you imagine that?

Then, from that place, think about yourself now, today. 

And ask yourself: What assumptions are stopping me right now from having that life?

What is stopping you right now?

Think. Pay attention.

Then begin taking a step forward to delete those assumptions and to be free from those limitations.

Any step. Any action. It all makes a difference.

Because what's incredible about life is:

As long as you hesitate, it seems the world works against you.

But when you decide to take action, the world helps you in magical ways. 

As long as you refuse to give up...

As long as you refuse to listen to your limitations... to the wrong assumptions that hold you back.

Go out there, turn the world upside down, break all limits, be heard, and begin to live your dreams.

That's what it means to LIVE.

And that's what I'm all about.

In the next episode, we will talk about James Bond, Tesla, and the day that almost made Elon Musk cry. 

Many deep lessons will be there. So make sure to listen to the next episode.

Finally, if you found any value in this episode, then support this Podcast, share it everywhere you can, and subscribe because you are important to me.

And if you have any question, or wish to tell me something, then send me an email to: mentor@storybonding.com

Good night. And may all your dreams become... reality.